Letter From the Chair, Fall 2017

It has now been several months since our annual conference. The semester is well underway, and we are all very busy with our teaching and research. But I look back fondly at the five days we had in Montreal, thinking about culture in one of North America’s most beautiful cities. I enjoyed my walk down the hill every morning to the Palais des Congres, and I enjoyed my excursions into the city. Above all, though, I enjoyed my time inside the conference venue, talking with my colleagues and listening to dozens of fascinating papers. Continue reading Letter From the Chair, Fall 2017

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2018 International Conference on Computational Social Science – Call for papers

The call for abstracts for the 2018 International Conference on Computational Social Science is now open. The conference will be held 12-15 July 2018 in Evanston, Illinois USA (just north of Chicago). The conference welcomes submissions on any topic in the field of computational social science, including (a) work that advances methods and approaches in computational social science, (b) data-driven work that describes or explains … Continue reading 2018 International Conference on Computational Social Science – Call for papers

2018 Junior Theorist Symposium – call for papers

This year’s Junior Theorist Symposium — an annual pre-conference hosted by the Theory Section of ASA — is seeking submissions for this year’s conference. It will be held in Philadelphia on August 10th. Submissions are open to late-career graduate students and early-career faculty (PhD received from 2014 and on). DEADLINE to submit is February 8, 2018. Submission details can be found at: http://www.asatheory.org/junior-theorist-symposium.html   Continue reading 2018 Junior Theorist Symposium – call for papers

2018 Culture Award Committees—Call for nominations

The Sociology of Culture Section’s Mary Douglas Prizes for Best Book Section members, authors, or publishers may nominate books published in 2017 or 2018. Self-nominations are welcome. Authors must be members of the Culture Section. Send a nominating letter, including a description of the book and its significance, to each of the committee members. Books that do not have an accompanying nomination letter by the … Continue reading 2018 Culture Award Committees—Call for nominations

Book Review: The Crisis of Journalism Reconsidered: Democratic Culture, Professional Codes, Digital Futures

The Crisis of Journalism Reconsidered (edited by Jeffrey C. Alexander, Elizabeth Butler Breese, Maria Luengo) is an important and necessary addition to cultural sociology. Continuing the call for a more focused and institutionalized media sociology, this volume demonstrates the utility of cultural sociology for media analysis. The wide-ranging pieces in this volume all consider (or reconsider, as the title suggests) the “crisis” of journalism. Continue reading Book Review: The Crisis of Journalism Reconsidered: Democratic Culture, Professional Codes, Digital Futures

Book Summary: Memory Activism: Reimagining the Past for the Future In Israel- Palestine

In my new book, Memory Activism: Reimagining the Past for the Future In Israel- Palestine (Vanderbilt UP, 2017), I examine how collective memories of a contested past can be used as a weapon of the weak for political change. The book presents and conceptualizes a surge in memories of a difficult past among civil society and grassroots groups around the world in the last two decades, which I term “memory activism.” Continue reading Book Summary: Memory Activism: Reimagining the Past for the Future In Israel- Palestine

Conference Report: History in Cultural Explanation

When I saw that Lyn Spillman’s (Univ. of Notre Dame) session, “History in Cultural Explanation,” was to feature no less than five papers, I wondered how on earth everyone would be able to give due diligence to their rich historical work within the allotted time. This might have been a problem with less capable presenters, but not with this group, whose presentations were all richly detailed and cogent and together demonstrated a useful array of concepts (cultural imaginaries, micro-practices, artefacts, continuity) and methods (corpus linguistics) for historical analysis, and convincingly demonstrated the irreplaceable role of historical analysis in the study of culture. Continue reading Conference Report: History in Cultural Explanation